The Role of Disturbances in Vaginal Microbiocenosis in Recurrent Urogenital Candidiasis

Authors

  • Munisa Abdushukurovna Mirsaidova Republican Specialized Scientific and Practical Medical Center of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, Tashkent, Uzbekistan
  • Malika Turakhanovna Alisheva Republican Specialized Scientific and Practical Medical Center of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, Tashkent, Uzbekistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.48112/acmr.v5i1.66

Keywords:

Recurrent urogenital candidiasis, vaginal microbiocenosis, PCR diagnostics, dysbiosis, antifungal therapy

Abstract

Abstract Views: 38

Purpose: This study aims to investigate the role of disturbances in vaginal microbiocenosis in recurrent urogenital candidiasis (UGC), focusing on the type of fungus present and the bacterial mass, using PCR diagnostics. Methods: Twenty-two women diagnosed with chronic vulvovaginal candidiasis were examined. PCR diagnostics, including the Mycoso-Screen analysis for fungal pathogens and the Femoflor-16 PCR test system for vaginal dysbiosis, were performed to determine the type of fungus and bacterial mass present. Results: Candida albicans was found in 36% of patients, Candida glabrata in 32%, Debaryomyces hansenii in 12%, Pichia kudriavzevii in 12%, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in 12%. Moreover, dysbiosis of vaginal microbiota was observed in 77% of patients, characterized by decreased lactobacilli and increased opportunistic microflora, contributing to the recurrence of UGC. Conclusion: Recurrent urogenital candidiasis is influenced by various factors, including the properties of yeast fungi and disturbances in vaginal microbiota. Comprehensive treatment addressing both fungal and bacterial components of dysbiosis may provide better therapeutic outcomes and reduce the recurrence of UGC. Further research is warranted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these interactions and optimize treatment strategies.

References

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Published

2024-04-28

How to Cite

Mirsaidova, M. A., & Alisheva, M. T. (2024). The Role of Disturbances in Vaginal Microbiocenosis in Recurrent Urogenital Candidiasis. Advances in Clinical Medical Research, 5(1), 01–03. https://doi.org/10.48112/acmr.v5i1.66